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Another Nordic Finn lighthouse update

A forum to discuss lighthouses on the West Coast Region of the US
(California, Oregon, Washington, Alaska, Hawaii)

Postby island » Mon Dec 03, 2012 9:50 am


In the US the electric supply systems were developed in the late 1800s and early 1900s for the purpose of providing practical lighting to replace kerosene lamps. However, at the time this was being implemented there was a challenge with the light bulbs, that being bulb life, filiment "burnout" at the higher voltages thus 120 volt became the standard. By the time reliable higher voltage bulbs were developed there had already been substantial investment made for 120 volt lighting.

Light bulb unreliability was one of several earlier factors for the delay in converting lighthouses to electricity for those few lights within a practical distance to a power supply. For the majority of lights, however, converting to own-make power was not cost effective so they remained illuminated by kersone lamps for many more years.
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Postby Kevin vk2ce » Tue Dec 04, 2012 8:13 pm


Well, well. So it's all Thomas Edison's fault. :lol:
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Postby island » Tue Dec 04, 2012 10:23 pm


One might have to agree that Edison was the primary culprit with his city lighting in 1882. But then at the time it was that tiny strand of wire within the light bulbs that determined the electrical system voltage of his lighting applications.

I got into this stuff as an offshoot of lighthouse research regarding replacement of kerosene by electricity. This led to an interesting book, or at least one I found interesting, Michael Brian Schiffer Power Struggles: Scientific Authority and the Creation of Practical Electricity Before Edison 2008. (on the internet -- Google Books)

One of the pre-Edison leaders in research and development was Prof. Joseph Henry who also served many years as chairman of the Lighthouse Board. Per Schiffer,"-the activities of Joseph Henry, mid-nineteenth-century America's foremost scientist—in determining the fate of particular technologies."

It is amazing to read about all that was involved in the development of that which we take for granted today.
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Postby boats » Tue Dec 04, 2012 10:33 pm


:D Howdee Ya All. Weather has taken it's time moving out east, then more shows up, a never ending thing around here, so we learn to live with it. In 23 days we got 24 inches of rain where I live, then this week we are off to another good start with 12 inches in the last three days. We call that "Normal" where as in other places its a wash out and many thing go down the road in a form of a new river. About 90% of my Christmas lights or up, the last 10% all ways cost me for some reason, I think it's because I keep adding more "Stuff" and my wife just tells me I'm the one that has to take it all down. The lighthouse gets a fair amount of the lights also. I call it fun, others say I have no place to go, and I'm never in a hurry to get there. Dave your a good man, Your like me in many ways in that there is things happening that make us mad and we say a thing or 40 or so, you get the point. Don't take what I said wrong, we are to old the fuss over the bad junk in the world. :roll: There, all better now. Kevin this 240 volt thing is different, Since I asked you and a few other folks, they all say what you said. "Don't know", never through to look it up or ask folks that work in that field. The one blok I asked works in the power company for over 25 years and he didn't know. Maybe I can find the answer in the barber shop, them guys know every thing. Any one out there, jump in here, lot of room for more folks. Make Fast Mates. "Boats"..
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Postby Kevin vk2ce » Wed Dec 05, 2012 12:00 am


island wrote:One might have to agree that Edison was the primary culprit with his city lighting in 1882. But then at the time it was that tiny strand of wire within the light bulbs that determined the electrical system voltage of his lighting applications.

I got into this stuff as an offshoot of lighthouse research regarding replacement of kerosene by electricity. This led to an interesting book, or at least one I found interesting, Michael Brian Schiffer Power Struggles: Scientific Authority and the Creation of Practical Electricity Before Edison 2008. (on the internet -- Google Books)

One of the pre-Edison leaders in research and development was Prof. Joseph Henry who also served many years as chairman of the Lighthouse Board. Per Schiffer,"-the activities of Joseph Henry, mid-nineteenth-century America's foremost scientist—in determining the fate of particular technologies."

It is amazing to read about all that was involved in the development of that which we take for granted today.


The unit of electrical inductance, the Henry, was named after the guy you mention, Dave.
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Postby Kevin vk2ce » Wed Dec 05, 2012 12:01 am


Sometimes I wonder, Al, just why you chose to live where you do. As I said before, it either raining or snowing. Maybe it reminds you of being at sea. :lol: :lol:
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Postby island » Wed Dec 05, 2012 1:22 am


The unit of electrical inductance, the Henry, was named after the guy you mention, Dave.


One in the same ---Joseph Henry. Also he served as the first Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, as well as a founding member of the National Institute for the Promotion of Science, a precursor of the Smithsonian Institution.
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Postby island » Wed Dec 05, 2012 7:07 am


Boats --- I have a question for you that you might ask of those barber shop folks.
Why do you drive on the right side of the road in the U.S. and on the left in other countries?
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Postby boats » Wed Dec 05, 2012 10:30 am


Right side Left side, 8) now the way I hard the story was this. In England the streetcars were put on the right side of the road, then it was moved to the center, in Japan the same thing, down under I'm not sure. Kevin may know that one. I was stationed in England and the down under, and in Japan too. Another way I hard the story was that them places were "Left Out" and we got it "Right". To tell the true answer, "I Don't Know". But I will say driving in them places is very different. So I did not drive in them places, cause I wanted to "LIVE" longer.. :roll: You could ask 10 people and get 10 different answers. OK I have a clear cold day to work out side, more lights.. Dave my family came from the sea, Mom came from Norway, her dad was a boat builder and fisherman, my Dad's family came from England. Ship builders, Navy, Marchant marines and fishing, rail roads. My Dad was 30 years in the Navy. We all lived and living in cold wet places. It was ment to be say many that do what we do. B**S***.. I hay the hot ares and love the cold wet places and love to complain about it. :wink: Kevin I love the milk in the down. :| What Was that all about. "Boats"..
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Postby island » Wed Dec 05, 2012 7:48 pm


So I guess we can't blame Edison for this. Henry Ford perhaps? (Ford's family came from County Cork, Ireland.)
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Postby Kevin vk2ce » Wed Dec 05, 2012 11:32 pm


I remember reading somewhere that Americans drive on the right hand side of the road because back in the stage coach days the driver sat on the left side of the coach and his shotgun man sat on the right side so when they got around to making cars they sat the driver in the left side and when they passed an oncoming vehicle they each veered to the right side of the road.

I would have thought they would have followed whatever happened in England as it was the Brits who settled in America, same as out here in the antipodes.
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Postby island » Thu Dec 06, 2012 5:03 pm


Much more than passenger transport there was the matter of the consideral amount of freight including farm products hauled in large wagons such as those manufactured in the early 1750s in the Conestoga region of Pennsylvania, pulled by a teams of large draft horses or oxen and with up to eight tons of freight. To control a team of several pairs the driver would often and somtimes entirely walk in the road beside the team to work this group of animals and to control the lead horse in the leading pair. With most drivers being right handed they would walk on the left side of the team with the team progressing along the right side of the road. And being in the road he would have a clear view of obsticles and oncoming traffic ahead. It was Pensylvania where there road right side rule was first implemented in 1792. I don't think wagons of this size pulled by several pairs of animals would have worked well in Brit-Land without numerous complaints from the citizens. Such were, however, adopted for use in French regions of Canada.

And , Kevin, there were more than just Brits on this side of the Atlantic. The Pennsylvania Dutch for example, but they were not Dutch. They were Deutsch.
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Postby CHUCKX53 » Sat Dec 08, 2012 2:28 am


From the two months from June-August with just a trace of rain and constant 90-100 F temps being the new norm, to this fall with an overabundance of rain, here is yet another drizzly weekend. It seems we are getting "Boats Weather" here in the soggy heartland. I can't recall when the ground was anywhere near dry since that super-summer heat wave.

So far, we've had one light 'dusting' of snow, amounting to about 1/10th of an inch, about a week ago. I recall times in the not-too-distant past where we would always get at least the first ground-cover snow around Thanksgiving, and December always had snow in it, nothing overwhelming, but a good bit. That has so all changed in the past 20-30 years. Our last 'blizzard' of any magnitude was way back in 1994, and the last real whiteout I saw was in 1997. And when did mere Cat-1 Hurricanes become so large and destructive ?

Anyhow, a shout out to the West Coast, where it seems things stay the same for our friend, wet and wild. I wonder if I could find Boat's Lighthouse on Google Earth to cheer me up ?
LIVE LONG AND PROSPER
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Postby boats » Sun Dec 09, 2012 8:20 pm


Hi Chuck, :D good to hear from you, and yes its raining now. The weather is changing all over the place, not here so much. We have the four seasons, (:| thats a sure thing, it's just some years we tent to get more rain then most places in the country. In Alaska the weather is cold most of the time, but we get more rain then they do. As for the snow, Alaska getts more snow then any one, :-j you never hear much about it. Reason.. It's very normal for them and the news and weather folks don't want to bring up there weather because then it would show the rest of the country they are wimps, =)) My brother lives in New Jersey in what he call's the sweet spot, weather goes around him, he lives is South Jersey in the Bridgetion area. What I love is the hills we have here, some or over 13.000 feet with snow on them year round. I'm sorry, did i say "Hills".. Chuck you must love where you live because your still there, Hi temps here, not happening here. This summer we did not see one (90f) this summer where I live. Love it.. \:D/ So now, what say you. "Boats"..
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Postby CHUCKX53 » Sat Dec 29, 2012 10:24 pm


Naw, it's the pits here, to tell the truth. But I'm stuck now, 4/5 of my kids are still in the area, + G-kids. Me and the wife were planning to retire up to Michigan, but that won't happen now that she's gone. So guess I'll spend out my days here instead of where I'd rather be, up along the coast with a Lighthouse in view.

One thing I wouldn't miss is the snow, and I remember on the West "Gold" coast of Michigan there was a lot of 'Lake Effect' snow from that one winter I did live there, 40 years ago gone past. The big plows would pile it up over the top of the street signs and the locals would say it was a mild winter. Down here, we got about 8 inches this week, and the Indy stations were going nuts, with all-day coverage of what they were calling a 'Blizzard'.....Believe me, it wasn't, I been in the actual blizzard of '78, was out in it and got stuck for 4 days. When I was able to make it back home the stuff was piled up along the roadsides 25-30 feet tall. We've had some hum-dingers here, but none of any real consequence since about '94 or so.

Boats, I wish you and yours the best for the New Year. Too much melted snow has gone over the breakwalls for us to party hard as we used to, so I will settle for a card game in a warm place to watch the ball drop come midnight this time around. :mrgreen:
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