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Full Moon pictures

A forum to post any lighthouse pictures you'd like others to see. Feel free to talk about lighthouse photography. Lighthouse-related photos (such as LSS and lenses) are also welcome.

Postby rocky5128 » Wed Jun 20, 2007 4:36 pm


Can anyone give me any tips to shoot a lighthouse with the full moon? There is a full moon this weekend, and I believe the next full moon is a very bright one. I would love to take a picture with a large moon in the picture, I usually get the moon, but it is so small I can barely notice it in the picture. I know the large moon is an optical illusion, but I ahve always wanted to get that picture. Any help is appreciated.

Kathy
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Postby Larry » Wed Jun 20, 2007 5:13 pm


I can't give you pointers on getting the moon tolook big, because I can't do it myself, but I can give you this pointer......

Don't go out looking for a full moon this weekend. You won't find one. But if you wait until next weekend, and it's not cloudy, you may see one.

You'll want to check here: http://aa.usno.navy.mil/ for moonrise and moonset times.
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Postby Hersh » Wed Jun 20, 2007 5:21 pm


Kathy, to see some moonrise shots, check out the un-contest we started last January, and a couple other links I'll put in at the bottom of this message.

The big trick to getting a moonrise shot is exposure, especially with a bright moon like you're planning on. I had such a situation when I shot Little Sable a couple years ago, the moon was so bright that if I metered for the moon, the rest of the scene was so underexposed it was nearly black, and if I exposed for the lighthouse and the beach the moon was blown out and even elongated. Gary once told me that if you expose for more than 20-30 seconds the moon will elongate due to it's motion in the sky. The trick I've used is shooting as soon as the moon breaks the horizon, because it's usually dimmer then. Of course that limits your composition options... The other thing you can do is use a graduated neutral density filter to hold back the part of the frame with the moon, but leave the rest alone.

As for making the moon large in the frame, it really depends on your location. If you are able to use a long lens and shoot tight onto say, a lantern and get the moon in the frame, the moon will look bigger. If you're in close and shooting a wide angle, the moon will look like a pinprick in the sky.

Here's a thread of some moon shots I took at Cape Henry in 2005.
http://www.lighthousing.net/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=4380

Here's the un-contest with moonrises in it.
http://www.lighthousing.net/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=5362

And here's a thread with another moonrise I shot, this one at Marquette.
http://www.lighthousing.net/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=6062
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Postby rocky5128 » Wed Jun 20, 2007 6:15 pm


Larry, you are correct, I am a week off. Time is just flying for me.

Mike, Thank You for the tips and the links. I am going to try my luck NEXT Weekend.

Kathy
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Postby Biggy » Wed Jun 20, 2007 8:03 pm


Interesting topic here. Living right by the Atlantic Ocean and Barnegat Lighthouse, I may try my luck with this very soon as well, although I might wait until the fall. I'll have to look at the moonrise chart for Barnegat Light to see when a full moon (or a very close gibbous phase) will be close to dusk.

But, knowing what I know of the moonrise on the East Coast, I would say the best time to shoot a moonrise near a lighthouse would be right around dusk, since the lighting would be more conducive. However, (and I certainly could be wrong), but I don't believe the summer months are the right time of year for that, because, if I recall from my astronomy studies, the full moon rises later in the evening during the summer.

The other thing is this: Getting a big moon in your shot will rely on how close to the horizon the moon is. If you can capture the lighthouse in your frame right after the moon rises (and I mean, literally, within one degree of it), that's when you'll have better luck. Of course, at different times of the year, the moon appears differently when it comes up. In the summer months, because of hazy conditions, it often looks orange, which may not bode well for a photo. The later fall and early spring months probably are better for this type of shot.

And obviously, you have to know from where the moon will rise in coordination with your shooting location. I'd study the moonrise locations a bit before wasting any time trying to wing it.

Anyway, Kathy ... Best of luck with that. Oh, and I'll see you on Saturday in Cape May!
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Postby Rob143 » Thu Jun 21, 2007 1:59 pm


rocky5128 wrote:I would love to take a picture with a large moon in the picture, I usually get the moon, but it is so small I can barely notice it in the picture.

Kathy


Each 100mm of focal length will result in a moon that occupies 1mm within your frame. If we're looking at a frame that is 24 x 36 mm you'll need to be shooting at least 400mm - 600mm to begin heading in the direction of that large moon.

Shooting a full moon one day before it technically becomes full will help as well because moonrise will still occur before sunset.
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Postby Hersh » Thu Jun 21, 2007 6:12 pm


I've never heard that formula before Rob, I'll be sure to tuck that one away in the mental file cabinet. Thanks.
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Postby Lighthouse Joe » Fri Jun 22, 2007 4:53 am


I took this about 5 years ago. Below is the shot exif data. I hope it helps.

Rubinar 500mm f/5.6 Reflex lens
Tamron AFD 1.4x TC
Nikon D100
ExposureTime : 1/100Sec
FNumber : 5.6 (f/8 w/TC)
ExposureProgram : Manual
ExposureBiasValue : EV-1.0
MeteringMode : Spot
FocalLength : 500mm (700mm with 1.4x TC)
ExposureMode : Manual
WhiteBalance : Auto
Contrast : Normal
Saturation : Normal
Sharpness : Soft

Image
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Postby WisKeeper » Tue Jul 17, 2007 9:10 pm


VERY NICE!
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Postby Pharoslvr » Wed Jul 18, 2007 8:45 am


Cool shot, Joe :!:
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