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Architectural Similarities

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Postby Hersh » Thu Mar 24, 2005 10:58 pm


In my earlier post I mentioned how similar the architecture is between the tower at 14 mile point lighthouse as captured by our friend Terry, and the St. Joe lighthouse depot. Here's a comparison between the two.

Image

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Guess the same bidder won both contracts... : )
Last edited by Hersh on Sat Apr 02, 2005 8:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Grover1 » Fri Mar 25, 2005 6:19 am


Mike,

Looking at the wider shot in your original post, the overall similarity is as apparent as the architectural intricacies of the closeups ... any more of these type pictures Mike?

I am a big fan of the "porthole" windows ... like at OMP.

I love the artchitecture ... thanks much for the post ... maybe Brent knows something of the building of the building?

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Postby beachbum1616 » Fri Mar 25, 2005 6:28 am


Which building was constructed first?
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Postby Hersh » Fri Mar 25, 2005 9:44 am


That's a really good question Stephen, I'll have to check on that one. I do have a couple more shots I can put up Barry, I'll see if I can get to it today yet.

As for Brent, I was hoping he'd help out some with the terminology for the brickwork and all that. I just say "ooh, bricks pretty"..... :lol:

I wonder if there was any functional purpose for the tower on the depot or if it was purely decorative?
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Postby beachbum1616 » Fri Mar 25, 2005 1:35 pm


Hersh said:
"ooh, bricks pretty".....


Mike, speaking for myself, you aren't the only one saying that!
:lol:
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Postby Zachary » Fri Mar 25, 2005 4:25 pm


I think 14 Mile Point was built first.
Also, 14 Mile Point is similiar to the Lighthouses at Big Bay Point
Image©Terry Pepper
and Forty Mile Point
Image©Ruediger, Cropped by Me
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Postby Hersh » Fri Mar 25, 2005 5:30 pm


Yes, Big Bay is very similar to fourteen mile. Here's a shot from my first foggy trip to this beautiful spot.


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Postby Grover1 » Fri Mar 25, 2005 6:32 pm


Mike,

That's a great look ... thanks.
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Postby Pharoslvr » Fri Mar 25, 2005 7:47 pm


The thing that stands out about the brickwork are the various types of "corbels" that they used. Cobels are the "step-ups" in the brick. But, what makes it even more interesting is the way they created a "dentil" effect with the corbels (individual inverted vertical teeth, so to speak). The designer's (and/or mason's) wanted to achieve a type of architecture that prevailed in England, the Neatherlands, and Germany during the Renaissance period of the 17th century. (An "Americanized version, so to speak.)
I've referred to the style as "Jacobean," quite a bit. It's not a "purebread" Jacobean but more of a mixture of other styles, too, including Early Gothic Revival, and maybe a little "Italianate".
Another interesting feature was the use of limestone (or granite) for accents such as lintels, belt-coursing, quoins, etc. (Note: In the tower shot at Big Bay....the contrasting stone course that is about a quarter of the way down from the top of the tower is a "belt course". It was not only a design feature but also strengthened the wall in the same way that a "bondbeam" does today.)

The amount of time that it took to lay-out the various brick designs (and then actually LAY the brick) always intrigues me because of the intricate patterns that were used. A lot of math went into these wonderful creations, as well!

Great topic, Mike! :)
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Postby Hersh » Fri Mar 25, 2005 11:00 pm


See, that's much better than my analysis... Thanks for the info Brent, I knew you'd come through.
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Postby Terry_Pepper » Sat Mar 26, 2005 1:35 am


ooh, bricks pretty
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Postby Hersh » Sat Mar 26, 2005 12:35 pm


=))

I'm glad there's someone else here that's on my level Terry !!! By the way, I hope you don't mind us using your pictures for this discussion.... I probably should have asked first.
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Postby Pharoslvr » Sat Mar 26, 2005 2:22 pm


By the way, thanks for the nice "close up" shots, Mike and Terry. It made it easy to do a short text by. The only thing better is to be there in person, and only then if I have a 200-300mm tele. :)
I've been to Big Bay but have never made it to 14 Mile, which is a dream of mine.

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Postby Terry_Pepper » Sat Mar 26, 2005 2:55 pm


After adding the page on Seeing The Light about “Cream City brick” a number of years ago, I considered adding a page covering the basics of masonry construction, including the different types of bonds and architectural elements used in lighthouse construction. While I have yet to create the page, I did keep my research notes, and found the following notes related to corbelling:

In brick laying, corbelling refers to the use of bricks which project beyond the face of a wall as cantilevers. It is a long used device with its origins in the fifteenth century BC.

In load-bearing brickwork, the maximum cantilevered distance is historically determined by the “one third rule,” that is, each brick should not project more than one third of its bed length, and the maximum distance corbelled by a number of bricks should not exceed one third of the wall's width.

While more frequently used at the upper ends of brick support columns, corbelling is also used to impart a feeling of the building “spreading its shoulders” to provide a more vertically imposing façade and to provide an increased area of support to a successive level.

This is certainly the case with all of the structures mentioned by Mike.

While Orlando Poe preferred cast iron or cut limestone for his gracefully shaped corbels, successive brick corbelling courses were frequently used in great lakes towers to support the weight of the cast iron gallery deck and the heavy lantern centered upon it. Some other interesting examples may be found at Two Harbors, Old Mackinac Point, Point Betsie and Port Sanilac.

BY the way Mike, no problem nabbing my photo, since you gave appropriate credit, and I am always happy to help out in any way possible .
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Postby Grover1 » Sat Mar 26, 2005 5:59 pm


Terry,

Thanks very much for the brick work ... Its much appreciated ...

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