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IOV Thermostat

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Postby island » Sat Apr 16, 2005 4:54 pm


Technology trivia question.
What was an IOV thermostat?
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Postby Terry_Pepper » Sat Apr 16, 2005 6:06 pm


Just a SWAG - Could it be a thermostat installed on an IOV system to prevent overheating?
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Postby island » Sun Apr 17, 2005 8:06 am


Terry, You are headed in the right direction. It relates to the lamp overheating but not that alone. There is more to the story.
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Postby island » Wed Apr 20, 2005 2:44 pm


Hint: IOVs were often tricky to operate so the thermostat was installed to assist the keeper in a somewhat unique way.
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Postby beachbum1616 » Wed Apr 20, 2005 7:37 pm


:-k
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Postby cawteener » Wed Apr 20, 2005 7:43 pm


:?:
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Postby Terry_Pepper » Wed Apr 20, 2005 8:10 pm


OK David – I’ll take another stab at it.

It occurs to me that IOV lamps operated in a type of “chicken or egg” type fashion, inasmuch as the pressurized kerosene was forced to the vapor lamp where it was vaporized by the heat radiated from the incandescent mantle, which in turn made the mantle burn hotter, emitting the high intensely white light typical of the system.

As such, it would seem that the mantle would need to be pre-heated, and thus I’ll conject that the thermostat sensed the temperature of the mantle during a preheat cycle, automatically releasing pressurized kerosene from the reservoir when the temperature of the mantle reached a predetermined level high enough to cause vaporization.

Or not!!
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Postby island » Thu Apr 21, 2005 6:52 am


Terry,

Your description of the possible use of a themostat sounds like a good plan. It certainly would have very helpful to the keeper during the startup phase of his IOV. But this was not the purpose or function of the IOV thermostat.

The IOV thermostat was not installed at light stations until 19 years after the introduction of IOV lamps. It had no physical connection to any operating part or control mechanism for the lamp system. It did, however, have a significant impact on efficient lamp operation and was a very useful tool for the light keepers.

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Postby Terry_Pepper » Thu Apr 21, 2005 8:25 am


OK - my final stab....

How about controlling a pre-heater for the kerosene reservoir?

Just don't tell me it was for heating the lantern - or the next thing I will expect is to hear that lanterns in your neck of the woods were air conditioned - ](*,)
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Postby island » Thu Apr 21, 2005 9:05 am


Terry,

Air conditioned lanterns. Now that would have been great. Lanterns did get uncomfortably hot on sunny days in the summer even with the storm pane shades drawn.

This IOV thermostat did favorably impack the keeper's comfort, comfort of mind, not of body. :? :)

The thermostat had no physical connection to the lamp controls including the fuel system, fuel storage and not to the lantern vents, door to gallery or lightning rod on the lantern roof.

Like your mother used to say
"Terry, if you'd look a little further than the end of your nose, you might find what you are looking for!"


This quote, Terry, is very true since April 8th. :idea: :)
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Postby Terry_Pepper » Thu Apr 21, 2005 9:40 am


Good memory David - however, my mothers' admonishment was given when I had 20/20 vision - and with increasing years under my belt, my eyesight is failing - besdies, my nose must be too damned long! :^o

How about somebody else weighing-in on this subject with a guess?
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Postby island » Thu Apr 21, 2005 10:06 am


Terry,

What did you receive in the mail on April 8th???

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Postby Fred » Fri Apr 22, 2005 6:29 am


I'll take a guess that the thermostat was mounted near the mantle and if the lamp had low pressure or went out the thermostat would change over and operate an alarm?

If so it must be American---Scottish lightkeepers were supposed to remain in the lightroom when paraffin lights were in use!

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Postby island » Fri Apr 22, 2005 8:02 am


Fred,

You are on the mark!

The thermostat sensor was positioned directly above the IOV mantle. With the lamp burning properly the thermostat high and low temperature set points were adjusted so that contact would be made and an alarm would sound if the lamp began to burn too hot or too cold.

The thermostat was powered by four 8-volt dry cell batteries and was wired to an alarm bell or buzzer located remote from the lamp such as in the watch room or the service room at the base of the tower, perhaps in some cases, in the keeper’s dwelling.

This served as an early warning system to alert the keeper before major problems developed. It was much more timely and efficient than looking up at the light from outside at ground level or from a dwelling window and seeing the lantern full of smoke. 8O

Even if the keeper stayed in the lantern at all times when the lamp was lit, the themperature indicator provided by the thermostat dial pointer would tell him of subtle changes in lamp burning before it could be determined by eye.

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Postby Fred » Fri Apr 22, 2005 1:15 pm


A lucky guess!
You are right that slight variations in light intensity were quite hard to see,we used to go by the sound.
When we changed the needle valve (Controlled fuel flow to the vaporiser) we set it up by sight and sound,a final check since it was a Chance 55mm lamp was that it used about one pint of fuel per hour.

One aid for keepers that we had for a time at Point of Ayre lighthouse was a radio microphone in the lightroom,so we could tune in any radio in the station area and hear the bell operated by one of the drive cogwheels.At the time the light had been changed from paraffin to electric but retained the clockwork drive,with the character at the time it took eight minutes per revolution of the lens,standing outside on a clear night you had to look for a while to be sure it was turning,if there was a bit of haze in the air you could then see the light spokes turning quite easily.

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