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Tis the Season > Montauk

A forum to discuss lighthouses Mid-Atlantic Region of the US
(New York, New Jersey, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Delaware)

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Postby BMR » Wed Dec 04, 2013 4:55 pm


There are two pips in a beaut, four beauts in a lulu,
eight lulus in a doozy, and sixteen doozies in a humdinger.
No one knows how many humdingers there are in a lollapalooza.
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Postby MontaukPoint » Sat Dec 14, 2013 7:41 pm


Makes me want to head back out there. I think its been about 4 years.
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Postby island » Sat Dec 14, 2013 9:50 pm


It might be a bit uncomfortable at Montauk tonight and Sunday with a typical northeaster moving up the coast.

... Gale Warning remains in effect until 6 PM EST Sunday...
* location... Fire Island Inlet to Montauk Point NY out 20 nm.
* Winds... east wind becoming southeast tonight 25 to 35 kt with
gusts up to 45 kt. West wind 20 to 30 kt with gusts up to 35
kt Sunday.
* Seas... 10 to 14 feet.
* Timing... strongest winds and highest seas tonight after
midnight.
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Postby BMR » Sun Dec 15, 2013 6:20 am


Third coastal storm in a week ... second
major one ...

Here along the mid New Jersey coast,
after a sloshy hour or two,
it was a wind/rain event ...
There are two pips in a beaut, four beauts in a lulu,
eight lulus in a doozy, and sixteen doozies in a humdinger.
No one knows how many humdingers there are in a lollapalooza.
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Postby island » Mon Dec 16, 2013 7:48 pm


It was coastal storms of this kind years ago in the age of sail that was the most significant cause for loss of many ships and loss of life. This led to the implementation of the storm warning signal system, the display of storm warning flags during day and lanterns at night to warn mariners when in route of the approach of storm systems and to seek a harbor of refuge.
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Postby Fred » Tue Dec 17, 2013 2:45 pm


I remember storm signals,the stations I was at only hoisted Daytime signals.

We would get a message from the Coastguard to hoist the South or North cone,then at times with a gale blowing and if the wind had veered to change from North to South cone etc and the cone doing its best to take off.

I think we discontinued them in about 1981.
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Postby Fred » Tue Dec 17, 2013 2:58 pm


A quick guide to our storm signals.

The Cone is three feet high and three feet wide at the base,and appears as a triangle when hoisted.The Signal is kept flying until dusk,and then lowered,but hoisted again at daylight next morning.

The signal will be lowered when the wind is below gale force and it is anticipated that there will be a period of not less than 6 hours with winds of less then gale force.

The Cone is kept flying during a lull in the wind if a renewal of the gale is expected.
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Postby island » Wed Dec 18, 2013 9:21 am


In the U.S. the earlier storm warning displays utilized an 8-foot square red flag with black center in combination with a red or a white pennant 8 feet high and 15 feet long. The pennant indicated the forecast wind direction. The red pennant denoted easterly, north-easterly if flown above the flag and south-easterly if flown below the flag. The white pennant was similarly displayed above for north-westerly or below the flag for south-westerly winds. Two red fags denoted hurricane or full gale and a single red pennant for small craft warning. At nights using lens lanterns, two reds for northeast, one red for southeast, white over red for northwest and red over white for southwest. Three lanterns denoted hurricane, two reds with the white in the center. At a number of lighthouses along the coast tall storm signal display towers were constructed, a skeletal tower with a flag mast mounted on top. In the earlier years a Storm-Warning Displayman was employed by the Weather Bureau to operate and maintain the tower and lanterns.

Storm signal displays were discontinued several years ago but a modified storm warning display (below) was recently re-instituted and is in current use at a number of Coast Guard stations.
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